Transforming Teachers - Biblical integration

  • The Integration of Faith and Science Learning

    by William Cobern
    from Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith, 1988

  • The task of Christian schooling

    As we look around us, we observe increasing moral decline. Changes in our society introduce us to philosophies that blatantly counter biblical principles. Humanism and relativism are making their way into the ideologies of school systems. "Faith in the moral autonomy of individuals has resulted in a society that has lost its moral moorings" (Van Brummelen, 1994). How can we resist these trends? Christian schools must take a closer look at what we are doing to prepare our students for living in a degenerating society. As Christian school educators in North America or in other parts of the world, we recognize that our students need to be equipped to face the opposition they will inevitably encounter as they become an active part of society. But what is Christian school education? How is a Christian school different from a public school or another private but wholly academic school? Are Christian schools showing evidence of the differences?

  • The Truth Project

    By Focus on the Family
    "...a DVD-based small group curriculum comprised of 12 one-hour lessons taught by Dr. Del Tackett. This home study is the starting point for looking at life from a biblical perspective. Each lesson discusses in great detail the relevance and importance of living the Christian worldview in daily life."

  • The Veritas Forum

    "...university events that engage students and faculty in discussions about life's hardest questions and the relevance of Jesus Christ to all of life"

  • Virtual Center for Faculty Development

    Resources and books reviews on integration of faith and learning
    from the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities

  • VirtualSalt

    “Resources for the integration of faith and learning”

  • Visual Valet - Personal assistant for Christian thinkers and teachers

    Transforming Teachers

    It is hard to find students – or teachers - who have been instructed on how to develop as a Christian thinker. The subject is incomprehensibly large because it involves everything in creation as well as the infinite Creator. Busy teachers and maturing students need something to help them get started. The Visual Valet is just such a personal assistant. Though it may not be sophisticated enough for philosophers and educational theoreticians, it will assist you in becoming a distinctively Christian thinker and teacher. Like a Swiss army knife, it may be incomplete and unsuitable for large projects, but extremely valuable for many daily tasks.

  • Visual Valet introduction - PPT

    The introductory Visual Valet PowerPoint is now available with audio. It outlines three ways that the Visual Valet can help Christian thinkers and teachers.

    You can hear a little of what is presented in a live seminar by viewing the Visual Valet Introduction online as an Office Mix or download a video of the presentation for use offline.

    You can also read online the core ideas, download a PDF of the whole book or purchase the Visual Valet e-Book to read offline.

  • Visual Valet is now available in Chinese and Spanish

    You can now read the Visual Valetin English, Spanish or Chinese. PDF copies of both are available for free download.

    English button

    Español button

    Chinese button

    The Visual Valet is also available as a Kindle eBook in both English and Spanish.

    Kindle Englsih

    Kindle español

  • Visual Valet summary

    VV200A simple, memorable diagram like the Visual Valet - Personal assistant for Christian thinkers and teachers, may be worth more than thousands of words about Biblical integration and Christian philosophy of education. A single page summary of three major ways this visual organizer can be used, is available in multiple languages.

    Swiss army knifeChristian thinking involves everything in creation as well as the infinite Creator. Busy teachers and maturing students need something to help them. The Visual Valet is just such a personal assistant. Though it may not be sophisticated enough for philosophers and educational theoreticians, it can assist you in becoming a distinctively Christian thinker and teacher. Like a Swiss army knife, it may be incomplete and unsuitable for large projects, but extremely valuable for many daily tasks.

  • VV示意图

    Visual Valet - 中文翻译

  • What does the incarnation have to do with teaching?

    As believers we seek to live a fully integrated life, weaving our understanding of the scriptures and the doctrines of the faith into every nook and cranny of our existence. This is a pretty lofty and abstract goal, and it can be difficult to figure out what it means in practical terms. What, for instance, does the doctrine of the incarnation have to say about the way you engage students in the classroom?

  • What if learning - AU

    “…built around concrete examples of teachers connecting Christian faith with their teaching”

  • What if learning - UK

    “…for teachers who want their classrooms to be places with a Christian ethos whatever the subject or age group”

  • What if learning - US

    “…includes a wide array of examples of connecting Christian faith and teaching across various ages and subjects”

  • What's Biblical integration?

    Personal reflections on the nature and challenges of relating all of life and learning to God and His Word

  • When a mathematician says no

    “When all the impermanencies of the world are considered, when one thinks of vast empires that have fallen, of religious beliefs and customs consigned to the ash-heaps of time, of facts and systems of science patched up as a result of body blows received from pummeling nature; when one sees day-to-day arrangements of life changing rapidly even as we live in them, in what quarter are we to find a yearned for permanence? One answer has been-and it has been an answer for a very long time indeed - mathematics. It is asserted that the proven statements of mathematics are true and indubitably so; that they are universal, that their truth is independent of time and of national (or even intergalactic) origin. These are commonly held views; and since they are by no means self-evident, they have naturally been the subject of discussions for rather a long time. Such discussions have, over the years, constituted a good fraction of what is called the philosophy of mathematics. In the opinion of the writer (and of many observers of the mathematical scene) these views are naive and lead to a picture of mathematical activity that is inadequate.”

    From “When a Mathematician Says No,” Mathematics Magazine, Volume 59, Number 2, Pages: 67-76

  • Why are the theorems of mathematics true?

    It is rare for someone to pose a mathematical question that elicits a variety of answers, but Philip J. Davis has done just that, commenting wryly, "There are probably more answers to this question that there are people who have though deeply about it."

  • Why Johnny can't multiply: Another legacy of postmodernism

    “I met a young man who had recently graduated from high school, where a mathematics teacher had labeled him a ‘bigot’ for thinking it was important to get the right answer.” (Nancy Pearcey, Total Truth)

  • Why the mathematicians, more than other scientists, tend to believe there's a God

    Of all scientists, mathematicians are most inclined to believe in God. – A finding of Professor Edward Larson of the University of Georgia and Larry Witham of Bartonsville, Maryland, in a survey of 600 scientists, as reported by the London Weekly Telegraph.